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6 Valentine Gift Ideas

In a month it is Valentine’s Day. If you are looking for something other than just flowers or chocolate this year then, perhaps we, at About Canada, can help.

Save the flowers and chocolate for another day and have a look at our Valentine’s Day gifts ideas instead. There are some for her, some for him and some for either one of you.

All are available online, and now is a good time to allow for posting to leave you more time for primping and prepping for what should be the most romantic day of the year.

I have shown just 6 ideas. But if you click on the Valentine Gift Ideas link then you can look through a whole range.


Hoselton Aluminum Heart People


Heart People

Kramer Intimacy Sculpture


Intimacy Sculpture

Cori Ross Opposites Attract


Opposites Attract

Silver Eagles Heart Hummingbird


Silver Heart Hummingbird Pendant

Tree Of Love - with special date


Tree Of Love

Sue Coleman - Wolf


Wolf (Loyal to those they love)

Check out the other Valentine Gift Ideas.

And if you are interested

This February is especially romantic as it is a Leap Year. Traditionally a leap year is the only time in four years when a lady can propose to a gentleman as, in the olden days, this would have been scorned upon. The day ladies can take their chances was on the actual Leap Day, the 29th of Feb.

Some believe this tradition was started in 5th century Ireland when St. Bridget complained to St. Patrick about women having to wait for so long for a man to propose. According to legend, St. Patrick said the yearning females could propose on this one day in February during the leap year.

While some say that Valentine’s Day is celebrated in the middle of February to commemorate the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial — which probably occurred around 270 A.D — others claim that the Christian church may have decided to celebrate Valentine’s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to “christianize” celebrations of the pagan Lupercalia festival. In ancient Rome, February was the official beginning of spring and Lupercalia, which began at the ides of February, February 15, was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman god of agriculture, as well as to the Roman founders Romulus and Remus.

Later, during the Middle Ages, it was commonly believed in France and England that February 14 was the beginning of birds’ mating season, which added to the idea that the middle of February — Valentine’s Day — should be a day for romance.

In Great Britain and North America, Valentine’s Day began to be popularly celebrated around the seventeenth century. By the middle of the eighteenth century, it was common for friends and lovers in all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection or handwritten notes.

Today, according to the Greeting Card Association, an estimated one billion valentine cards are sent each year, making Valentine’s Day the second largest card-sending holiday of the year. (An estimated 2.6 billion cards are sent for Christmas.) It is celebrated accross the world but of note are

  • Taiwan where Valentine’s Day is celebrated on February 14, but there is also a special Valentine’s Day on July 7.
  • In Japan, and Korea, Valentine’s Day is celebrated on two different dates. February 14 and March 14. On the first date, the female gives a gift to the male and on the second date, known as White Day, males give gifts to females (though in Japan the male has to return the gift he received on February 14 so really the Japanaese lady actually choosing her own gift!).
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